Blog

RSA Conference 2018 Impressions

Held April 16-20 at Moscone Center in San Francisco, this year’s RSA Conference included 42,000 attendees, 700+ speakers, and 600+ companies on the expo floor – all sharing their views about today’s information security challenges and how to solve them. But collectively as the security industry, do we have a clear strategy to win the war against malware and hackers?

Kirstjen M. Nielsen, Secretary of the Department of Homeland Security, gave a keynote address, discussing the U.S. government’s cybersecurity goals and strategies and stating categorically that “cybersecurity is national security.” At the same time, 34 tech companies signed the Cybersecurity Tech Accord. While these developments represent progress, are they enough to gain the upper hand over the continued growth in data breaches?

On the privacy front, GDPR took center stage driving emphasis on consumer privacy and protecting consumer data. Many companies are looking to capitalize on providing services helping others to comply with strict GDPR requirements. I believe that this regulation will have a real positive impact on protecting consumers.

Although hundreds of companies exhibited at the conference, I could not help thinking that most are still approaching the market from a legacy perspective, showcasing products built for traditional networks and infrastructure. Sure, everyone is mentioning cloud and digital transformation, but there were few blueprints on how to deal with cloud applications, unknown devices, and shadow IT.








PreviousNext

OPSWAT at RSA Conference 2018

Amid all this uncertainty, OPSWAT’s clear strategy resonated with hundreds of participants who stopped by the booth to attend our executive presentations, see our demos, and chat with our technical experts. Our “Trust no file. Trust no device.” approach provides a way forward for organizations to achieve higher levels of advanced threat prevention by combining data sanitization (aka CDR: Content Disarm and Reconstruction), multi-scanning, and vulnerability scanning and by blocking risky devices from accessing cloud applications. Among the multitude of complex messages from hundreds of vendors, it is critical to provide a clear actionable strategy to reduce the risk of getting breached.

OPSWAT at RSA Conference 2018

Amid all this uncertainty, OPSWAT’s clear strategy resonated with hundreds of participants who stopped by the booth to attend our executive presentations, see our demos, and chat with our technical experts. Our “Trust no file. Trust no device.” approach provides a way forward for organizations to achieve higher levels of advanced threat prevention by combining data sanitization (aka CDR: Content Disarm and Reconstruction), multi-scanning, and vulnerability scanning and by blocking risky devices from accessing cloud applications. Among the multitude of complex messages from hundreds of vendors, it is critical to provide a clear actionable strategy to reduce the risk of getting breached.